Monthly Archives: March 2014

Proper Grammar

As a Language and Literacy student at Harvard, I learned that there was a such thing as African American Vernacular English (AAVE).  In a nutshell, the research stated that African Americans especially those who are from the south combine the Southern dialect and African dialect carried from slavery time that translates into everyday speech.  Growing up, my mother would call it speaking improper English (or ebonics) and academia would classify it as a colloquial language.  It is not language that you would use to write a formal letter or paper, in short this dialect should only be a dialect among peers and familiar friends.

My concern is that this research has given a pass to some educators to not correct this dialect because they dear that they are being insensitive to the African American culture.  By not requiring students to enunciate and use the correct verb tenses, they are being more sensitive to how students speak at home and respecting the student and their family.  Personally I think by not requiring students to speak with proper verb tenses and enunciation, we are actually doing them a disservice.  If at a young age  they do not hear the correct verb tenses and correct pronunciation of words, they run the risk of sounding uneducated as they get older because it is no longer cute to not know.

As a reading specialist it is a problem because this improper grammar ultimately affects a child’s ability to read  and comprehend.  The better the grammar or the knowledge of the correct way to speak, the better students are able to understand lectures and books way above their levels.

I do agree that students should be able to express themselves in anyway they choose when they are not in an academic setting, however we must draw the line during presentation and speaking to adults in school.  This is the same idea as using emoticons and texting abbreviations while writing a formal paper.

How do we draw the line between sensitivity and academia? Should grammar just be a lesson in code switching as Delpit asserts?

Leave your thoughts.

 

~Say

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Candy is good sometimes…

Read all of it before you come with pitchforks!!!!

As a self proclaimed bibliophile, I have bookshelves upon bookshelves of books from my early childhood well into my various college and graduate courses.  My parents were amazing and even have the box of all of my papers from kindergarten and first grade.  Some may say it may border on being a hoarder, but it really pains me when I think of families who throw out outgrown books like old clothing.

Imagine that first book that you loved so much when you were a child.  It got you interested into reading. It is timeless, it was your gateway book.  For some people, you don’t know what book that is until you get much older.  You know what book that is because you have read it so much that you need tape and other mediums to keep it together.  During my presentation, one of my families stated that they would throw out the Junie B. Jones books that his daughter reads so much that she doesn’t read anything else.  The teacher in me says sure, “Go ahead put the book away,” but the bibliophile in me says “NO!!!! PLEASE DON’T!!!”

When a child finds the book that gets them into reading, it is always good to keep the book around.  It reminds students of where they came from as a reader and should be kept as a memento for when they are reading five million text books.  Books are a part of her childhood.  By throwing the book away instead of just putting it away you are forcing them to lose a piece of their innocence.

The early chapter books and comic books are like candy to reading children.  It may not be helpful to their reading levels, but it will help sustain their love of reading.  They revisit those books when times get hard or need a familiar adventure.

Should they be reading  these books every night?  Probably not.  It is okay for them to indulge in these books once in a while.  You would never feed your child McDonalds or Chick-fil-a for breakfast, lunch, and dinner, but you could give it to them once in a while as a treat.  It is a reward.  Reading a comic book or other book is like candy or McDonalds (Chick-fil-a), they are a reward, however you don’t have to do away with them completely.

 

So please, don’t throw out books just because your child has outgrown them. Let them decide which books are timeless and make them excited to read.  Ultimately it will help them to keep their childhood.

 

Happy Reading

~Say

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Balanced Diet

This weekend I had the pleasure to present to families about the habits of great readers.  I love doing these developments because I am able to really talk in depth to a family about their child and their work especially as it relates to reading.  We started by talking about how we would eat properly and have a balanced diet of food.  I took the idea of the now defunct food pyramid and related it to reading.  Something told me that this would make this sticky for our families.  They loved it.  Here is the graphic.  This week I will unpack what this all means.  Let me know about your thoughts.

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Enjoy

~Say

Reluctant vs. Avid Readers

So imagine this, your students come to your class early, grab their reading discussion books and just start reading…to each other. No directions were on the board, in fact you aren’t even there yet, however no one would know because these children are reading and facilitating their own discussions without adult hand holding.
Any classroom teacher would say it has to do with the routines and procedures. They would say that I must set them up early on in the year and gave them the expectations. To be honest, I would say it had less to do with routines, and more to do with how much these children love literacy. They love to discuss it with each other. They love to read to each other and justify their answers. In order to be successful with their discussions, they had to read the night before to participate or they would be lost. They have such high investment because of the discussions. They get to to talk to each other not to me, their teacher and let me tell you it just overjoys my heart.
For most children it takes one book that gets them to read forever. For my children it was a series of books. The group of children I work with are what educators would classify as reluctant readers. There are a series of interventions, prescriptions, and plans for getting them to read on grade level. I think what made me successful with these amazing readers helping them to read and access books that they can fall in love with. They are excited to come to class to find out what happens next and now that they can take the book home they just want to ensure that they read some more, even beyond the requirement.
The difference between a reluctant reader and a avid reader is the keystone book or author. As educators, parents, or friends who have friends who have children, it is important to keep introducing children to keystone books. They make the most of difference.

Believing

How do you feel right now?  I just re-watched Ann Cuddy’s TED talk on body language. I learned that a defeated mentality and body persona really impact how you deal with stress and really uncomfortable situations.  As I go through this blooming stage, I find this information really important in dealing with more an more uncomfortable situations and information.  

My mom would say it has a lot to do with positive thinking and positive beliefs.  What you believe is who you are.  So as I go through this moment of blooming, it is important that I remember to stay positive.  I also spent sometime reading The Power of Right Believing, which told me to remember who I am.  Today was a good day. Tomorrow will be better. Can’t wait to see what it has in store. 

 

http://www.amazon.com/The-Power-Right-Believing-Addiction/dp/145555314X

~Say

Blooming

“And the day came when the risk it took to remain tightly closed in a bud, was more painful than the risk it took to blossom.”

–Anaïs Nin

The last time I posted I wrote about the importance of no being a just.  Well instead of being a hypocrite, I decided to follow my own advice, and work on being me not just a just.  I mean how comfortable is it to just remain in your comfort zone and do what you always have done?  But what happens when what you always have done, no longer describes you? You’ve lost your drive, motivation, gumption,  spark, what ever you want to call it.  This week has been hard for me because I decided that it is time for me to blossom not just as a person but as a citizen of the world.  To be honest that ish hurts, but then in the words of a good mentor of mine, “if it doesn’t scare the shit out of you, then it really isn’t worth it.” So instead of playing with the idea, I have started to go out on a limb and be vulnerable, ask for help and get rid of things that were once my comfort zone and my overall comfort. Did I say that this week hurt?  Well it did.

As a teacher I force my kids out of their comfort zones everyday, I tell them to take risks, cry laugh and not be afraid of the fact that some days some people will not be your favorite people.  However the people who love you unconditionally will always be there.  This week I went out on a limb and let me tell you that by going out on that limb it was emotionally and professionally draining, however it hurts too much to sit still and be tightly closed in a bud.  Instead it is time for me to figure out how to be the best me there is to become.  I am young, and fine as I don’t know what and being a just is just not enough.

So sometimes I will journal and other times I will blog, but my main thing is to continue to write.  I love people, but the first key to not being a just, is to love and appreciate myself and these past years that hasn’t been happening as much.

Is it time to move on?  Absolutely!  Is it time to be accountable to my brain and life goals?  Totally.  By April as the rain showers descend, I will be blossoming with the flowers.  It hurts way too much not to bloom.  As I walk through this journey, I am reminded of the fact that all actions and events happen for a reason and because of that everything will fall into play.

~Say